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Vancouver referencing guide (Online): Combining Multiple Sources to create a chart

Mae’r dudalen hon hefyd ar gael yn Gymraeg

Combining multiple sources to create a chart

In-text:

If you are combining information from multiple sources to create a chart of your own, then label your own chart using the word Figure and allocate the numbers sequentially, for example:  Figure 1.

Give the chart a meaningful title to describe the combined information.

At the end of the title, list the reference numbers for each separate item you have referred to.

Table number. Title. Reference number

Table 3. Estimated UK prevalence of diabetes.(1, 2, 13-14)

Reference list:

Each reference to the information, e.g. different tables or charts, you have used to create your own chart will require a separate entry in your Reference list. Even if you have used two tables from one article and combined the information into your own chart, you will need to reference each source separately in your reference list, as each table in the article will have a separate title.

In your Reference list, for each table or chart that you have used, write the number of the original table/chart and original table/chart title as set out in the article and the page number where the table was listed.

You need to add [adapted] at the end of each reference as you have merged the information to create your own graph.

Reference list examples:

Hex N, Bartlett C, Wright D, Taylor M, Varley D. Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK, including direct health costs and indirect societal and productivity costs. Diabetic Medicine. 2012; 29:855–62. Table 1, Estimated UK prevalence of diabetes 2010 ⁄ 2011 and 2035 ⁄ 2036; [cited 2013 Jul 22]; p.858. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03698.x/pdf [adapted]

Hex N, Bartlett C, Wright D, Taylor M, Varley D. Estimating the current and future costs of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the UK, including direct health costs and indirect societal and productivity costs. Diabetic Medicine. 2012; 29:855–62. Table 2, Estimated UK prevalence of diabetes 2012 ⁄ 2013 and 2037 ⁄ 2038; [cited 2013 Jul 22]; p.859. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03698.x/pdf [adapted]