Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Publishing and Research Impact: Publishing Research

Mae'r dudalen hon hefyd ar gael yn Gymraeg

Publishing Research

This page goes through the various ins and outs of Academic publishing, and a step by step process of submitting to publishing with a journal, and some things to consider when working towards publishing a book. 

There are lots of pressures to publish rapidly, and more 'predatory journals' springing up online which can be difficult to differentiate from the real thing.

Publishing in a Journal

There seems to be a new Journal announced online every other week, and this includes 'predatory journals' so how can you tell if a journal you may want to submit to is legitimate?

There are some online services designed to help you choose a journal - for example, Elsevier Journal FinderJournal Selector

1. Check their website; does it look professional? Does it link to other sites, for example members of the editorial board and their home institutions? Is the grammar and spelling up to scratch?

2. Are they indexed? To be indexed by the main databases (like Scopus and Web of Science) a journal has to adhere to strict criteria. Google Scholar is not transparent in the way they indexed and therefore can't be reliable. 

To check whether the journal is indexed go to Scopus or Web of Science and search the Journal title. 

3. Some Journal titles are very similar so it is a good idea to check the ISSN. The ISSN should appear on the Journal 'About' pages, and you can check it on a site like Sherpa Romeo or search the Library Hub Discover for more information about the Journal. If it doesn't appear on either of them, be wary. 

What is a Journal Impact Factor and can it help me here?

The Journal Impact Factor is a measure reflecting the annual average (mean) number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. The JIF can be useful in comparing the relative influence of journals within a discipline, as measured by citations. However, it cannot be used as an indicator of the quality of individual articles or authors

If you are still unsure, get in touch with us. e.c.downes@swansea.ac.uk.  

The 'turn-around' time between submitted your article, having it reviewed and acceptance varies between discipline. It can takes weeks or months so check the journal's submission information for an estimate

The point at which decisions on Copyright and Open Access have to be made varies between journals but is generally around the Acceptance stage.

 You need to know a few things;

1. If you intend to publish the 'traditional route' or in 'subscription articles', this means that you do not pay any publishing costs, but your article will be behind a paywall for anyone outside of a university, or in a university which doesn't have a subscription to that journal. In this case you will be asked to transfer copyright to the publisher.

In this case, to comply with Swansea OA Policy, you will need to upload the Accepted Manuscript into RIS as 'Green Open Access'

2. If you intend to publish Open Access with the journal, this tends to result in the journal requiring an 'APC' - Article Processing Charge usually £2500+. More information about APCs and financing them are found on our Financial Support and Publisher Open Access Deals and Discounts pages. Swansea University Library has signed several deals with publishers that cover the cost of Open Access publication and the publisher receives payment for providing access to their journal portfolio.

If this is the route you choose, the article is assigned a 'Creative Commons' license which allows you to keep the copyright. The article is then freely available to anyone whether they subscribe to the journal or not.

For more information about Copyright and Author's rights please see our Copyright guide.

What do I need to do after the article has been accepted?

1. Create a record in RIS following the guidance. This ensures that your paper complies with REF rules if it is eligible. If you don't have the full details to fill in the record, that is fine. You or our team can fill in the details later, when information like the DOI, Volume and Issue number become available.

Upcoming Events

Academic Publishing Series: How the landscape is changing

This session aims to explore the current state of academic publishing focusing primarily on Journal Articles, and the transition currently underway towards Open Access.  This will include; - Ho…

Date:
Wednesday, Mar 10, 2021
Time:
11:00am - 11:30am
Location:
,
Categories:
 

Academic Publishing Series: Journal Articles from Submission to Publication

This session takes you through how the process works, what you should do and when (e.g. publishing open access and needing funding for an APC) Publishing in academic journals is a key element of ac…

Date:
Wednesday, Mar 17, 2021
Time:
11:00am - 11:30am
Location:
,
Categories:
 

Academic Publishing series: Books

This week's session looks at the process of publishing a book in Academia. We're really lucky to have Prof. Amy Brown from Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences joining us to share her ex…

Date:
Wednesday, Mar 24, 2021
Time:
11:00am - 12:00pm
Location:
,
Categories:
 

Academic Publishing: Predatory Journals

The pressure to publish is ever-present for researchers and academics, and accompanying this has been a rise in 'predatory journals'. These can exploit and target anyone from a first-time auth…

Date:
Wednesday, Mar 31, 2021
Time:
11:00am - 11:30am
Location:
,
Categories:
 

Academic Publishing: Measuring Research

This session explores the developing methods used in measuring research impact, including bibliometrics - which can include citation rates, publishing rates and institutional collaboration. …

Date:
Wednesday, Apr 7, 2021
Time:
11:00am - 11:30am
Location:
,
Categories:
 

Finding a book publisher

There are various options from learned societies and open access publishers to commercial publishers. Some things to consider:

  • Who publishes the books you use most often.
  • Do they offer peer review and/or have a good reputation. Colleagues can be a good source of information about publishers.
  • Consider who your book will be aimed at and whether there is a market for it. Does the publisher have an international reach?
  • Study the publisher's web site to find any advice they offer to authors. If you need a contact address to approach a publisher, many publishers can be found in the Academic Publishing Directory.
  • Be aware that some publishers will only accept a manuscript if they are the only one being considered. 
  • If there are book series in your subject area consider approaching the editor to see if they would be interested in your work - these often have a ready made audience.

 

Getting a Swansea University ISBN

If you are not using a conventional publisher and need an ISBN for your publication the library can supply one. This might happen for example if you are publishing conference proceedings or a report.

An ISBN will be nationally registered and details available to booksellers. It is a unique product number which identifies your publication. 

When your publication is ready for the ISBN simply complete the application form below. Send the completed form to iss-research@swansea.ac.uk. You will receive an ISBN number and we will register your publication in the national ISBN database. The cost will be met by the library.

You remain responsible for distribution of your publication and for dealing with legal deposit http://www.bl.uk/aboutus/legaldeposit/. Note that there is a legal requirement to deposit any publication published in the UK with the legal deposit libraries whether it has an ISBN or not.